Vancouver : Stanley Park Seawall

Nice weather and late sunset means more time to do activities – like walking around the 8.8 km  seawall around Stanley Park!

Towards Stanley Park
Towards Stanley Park

Technically we started at Waterfront Station and walked along the Canada Place through Coal Harbour towards Stanley Park; therefore, we walked more than 8.8 kilometers!  We never intended to walk the whole way but somewhere between thinking we can take a bus later and then realizing it was a road of no return, we finished it!

Seawall
Seawall

The start of the walk looks promising!  There were lots of visitors, perhaps they were making their way to the Aquarium or visiting the totem poles.  There was also an information booth and a cafe here as well.

seawall
seawall – 2015

The view as quite nice but due to the recent drought, the water drained a bit.  There is an after and before photo …

last year
sea wall – 2014
walk continues
walk continues
and on..
and on..

Brockton Point is a nice photo stop on the seawall.  It is at the most eastern point of the stop, marked by a 100-year-old lighthouse.  According to wiki, this point used to be an early cemetery in 1865!  The lighthouse was build in 1914 after many ship collisions and there was even a live in lighthouse keeper!

lighthouse
lighthouse

The walk continues … there are strips of beaches along the way ..

walk
walk

For the longest time, I did not know what this was, but it turns out, it is the replica figure-head of the once fastest ship on earth – RMS Empress of Japan.  It was constructed in 1890 and sailed between Vancouver and eastern Asia via the trans-Pacific route.  It was put out of commission in 1922 and scraped in 1926. The original figurehead was put here before it being moved to the maritime museum due to deterioration.

stanley park
Stanley park – Empress of Japan

Lion’s Gate Bridge, a suspension bridge build in 1938 that connects Vancouver to North Vancouver.  This bridge and the second narrows bridge still remains the two main ways of getting across the inlet – aside from the seabus.  Traffic jam is the norm, especially during rush hour – or worse, an accident.

Lions Gate Bridge
Lions Gate Bridge
lions gate
lions gate
Lions gate
Lions gate

After the Lions Gate bridge is the point of no return,to right is the sea and the left is the cliff … there was also barely any shade.

road of no return!
road of no return!
walking,.,
walking,.,

Stanley Park also has a rock called the ‘Siwash Rock‘.  The rock is sea stack, a volcanic dike where magma was forced through, creating a stronger entity that withstood erosion better than its neighbours.

Siwash Walk
Siwash Walk
Siwash Rock
Siwash Rock

After the Siwash Rock comes the various beaches .. starting with Third, Second, and English Bay (otherwise known as First Beach).  Continuing on is Sunset Beach.

beach !
beach !
beach
beach

If biking, there is a lane that takes visitors to the Lost Lagoon, but I just walked straight into English Bay instead.  Lost Lagoon was actually a lake, cut off for the construction of the Stanley Park Causeway (source) in 1916. It’s name come from a poem written by Pauling Johnson.

Lost Lagoon
Lost Lagoon
lost lagoon
lost lagoon

Weekday stroll over ~

Advertisements

One thought on “Vancouver : Stanley Park Seawall

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s